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Isotopes Park / Albuquerque Isotopes

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Isotopes Park / Albuquerque Isotopes
A Grand Overhaul
Judging a Book by its Cover
Some Quirks
All Pages

Isotopes Park, the home of the Albuquerque Isotopes, is a retro ballpark, but it's not retro in terms of brick and steel. Instead, Isotopes Park takes design cues from the 1940s and 1950s architecture found throughout Albuquerque and integrates them into a ballpark setting. Yes, it's retro in that it hearkens back to the dawn of the Nuclear Era, but it manages to evoke the era without a hint of irony or condescension -- and as a result Isotopes Park is one of the best ballparks in minor-league baseball.

Fast Facts

Year Built: 2003
Capacity:
12,215
Suites:
30
Architect
: Populous
Dimensions:
340L, 383LC, 428 start of hill, 400C, 404RC, 340R
Website: albuquerquebaseball.com
Phone: 505/924-2255
League: Pacific Coast League
Team Parent: Los Angeles Dodgers
Parking: As the stadium is next to The Pit and the UNM football stadium, there's an abundance of free parking within a block of the stadium.
Address/Directions: 1601 Avenida Cesar Chavez SE., Albuquerque. This address is slightly misleading. If you get on University, which runs north and south through the length of Albuquerque, you'll drive right by the stadium in the southeastern quadrant of the city. It's hard to miss.

"Retro" architecture in baseball usually means a ballpark all decked out with steel beams and brick walls, designed to look like an old ballpark from the turn of the century. And while retro been the hottest trend in ballpark design since the unveiling of Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore, it's a trend that's grown more than a little tired.

But retro shouldn't be limited to just steel-and-brick ballparks. In many ways, Isotopes Park, the home of the Albuquerque Isotopes, is a retro ballpark, but it's not retro in terms of brick and steel. Instead, Isotopes Park takes design cues from the 1940s and 1950s architecture found throughout Albuquerque and integrates them into a ballpark setting. Yes, it's retro in that it hearkens back to the dawn of the Nuclear Era, but it manages to evoke the era without a hint of irony or condescension -- and as a result Isotopes Park is one of the best ballparks in minor-league baseball.